Research Blog 8.

It Can Wait

This local county newspaper (Chester County, Pa) article discusses the deadly effects of mobile phone usage while driving. There are many dangers involved with driving but very few more so than mobile phone use itself.  Many responsibilities are tied to driving and one of the most important is that we need to be careful on the roads and try to steer clear from distractions. The deadliest of all: texting and driving. Each year, over 330,000 accidents are caused by texting while driving lead to severe injuries. Astonishingly, cell phone use behind the wheel kills 3,300 distracted american drivers every year, and only society can change this by simply remembering that texting can always wait. I found this article extremely interesting as it relates heavily to the area I want to base my research project on. In my opinion, the most surprising quote from this source was “60% of drivers use cellphones while driving”. This was extremely surprising to me as people are aware of the risks involved with mobile phone use while driving yet, on average, 6 in every 10 people in the US do continue to do it.

The Numbers Don’t Lie

I felt this article was extremely important to include in one of my research blog because in reality, the proof is in the pudding. The numbers don’t lie. In this particular article by The Huffington Post they capture 10 shocking statistics associated with mobile phone use while driving. For example:

  1. There are 9 americans killed each day from motor vehicle accidents that involved distracted driving, such as using a cellphone.

This was the most surprising statistic to me as approximately 3,300 needless deaths could be prevented each year.

6. You are four times more likely to be in a crash when using your mobile phone.

9. 46 states in the US have banned texting while driving regardless of age.

10. People in the 21-24 age bracket are more likely to send a text or email while driving, according to a 2012 survey.

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